(927-954) Vale of York Viking Hoard Coin

Make Your Own Medieval

$2.45 AUD 

Share:

This coin is a reproduction of a coin found in the Vale of York hoard estimated to be from the 10th century.

The Vale of York Hoard, also known as the Harrogate Hoard is a 10th-century Viking hoard of 617 silver coins and 65 other items including ingots, hacksilver and a rare gold arm ring. It was found undisturbed in a lead chest in 2007 near the town of Harrogate in North Yorkshire, England. Contained within was a gilt silver cup lined with gold full of coins. The hoard included objects from many diverse locations and shows the diversity of cultural contacts from Viking trade with objects coming from as far as Afghanistan, Ireland, Russia, Scandinavia and continental Europe. The size and quality of the material in the hoard is remarkable, making it the most important Viking hoard found in Britain since the discovery of the Cuerdale hoard in Lancashire in 1840.

The coins in the hoard date from the late 9th and early 10th centuries and is believed to have belonged to a wealthy Viking leader during the unrest that followed the conquest of the Viking kingdom of Northumbria in the year 927 by the Anglo-Saxon king Athelstan or during the expulsion and murder of the Viking king of Jórvík (York), Eric Bloodaxe, in 954. The hoard contained a new condition coin minted by King Athelstan to celebrate his capture of York in 927. It is thus likely that the hoard was buried in late 927 to 954.

The hoard is jointly owned by the Museum of York and the British Museum (London) and can be viewed on the following link https://www.yorkmuseumstrust.org.uk/blog/beyond-jorvik-the-vale-of-york-viking-hoard-andrew-woods/

These coins are hand stamped by a passionate reenactor who performs historical coin minting demonstrations. As each coin is hand stamped small variations may exist adding to the hand made character of the coins.

Buy in bulk for significant savings.